#NZLEAD PREVIEW: The Future of Recruitment, an #RHUBNZ Special

Picture1In two weeks I have the pleasure of experiencing New Zealand for the first time, when I speak in Auckland at the Recruiter Hub Conference (#RHUBNZ).  I am going to cover two interlinked subjects during the course of the day.

The first – The Future Of Recruitment Is Closer Than You Think  – is one of those subjects that many recruiters choose to ignore. Analysts the world over, cite ‘big data’, mobility trends, ‘talentism’ as well as many other considerations, companies need to act upon with regards to recruitment. But I believe there is a ‘future reality gap’ for recruiters who have their ‘day job’ to do – recruiting for their clients. They are not worried about things that ‘might’ impact them next year or in three years time – they have problems on their own desks right now.  Can you blame them?

Then I take a look at one of the new skills that needs to be embedded in future recruiters – Why Candidate Engagement Is More Than Just Being A Connection Or A Follower. It is all very good having the ability to find loads of potential candidates – but what do they represent most of the time? A longstanding record in a database, a name on a social network or just a name you have uncovered in a conversation? These are now available to anyone (who chooses to make the effort to find them) – including your clients and your competitors.

Questions for this week:

Q1) What does the future of recruitment look like? Is it really in the future or here and now? Why is there a gap?

Q2) How are you utilising technology in recruitment?

Q3) How does technology change the way we engage with candidates? How does this meet the needs of the candidate?

Q4)  What does the successful recruiter of the ‘future’ look like? How are these skills going to help with sourcing scarce talent?

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#NZLEAD PREVIEW: Attracting and retaining talent through engagement

ScottandAndy

People work not just for money, but also for a greater sense of meaning in their lives.  Engaged environments are more energetic, more rewarding and much more enjoyable to be part of.  We seek to build engagement because we have a belief that it has a positive impact on business performance.

We decided to team up on this blog, as we thought we may be able to present two slightly different perspectives on how engagement impacts the broader talent agenda. We’re interested to hear your thoughts on how engagement impacts the attraction and retention of talent, and how this is managed and communicated to an external audience.

The External Perspective

In the time I’ve worked in recruitment, I have had the pleasure of supporting a whole range of clients across a broad spectrum of industries and functions.  Not being “part” of my client organisations, I am somewhat reliant on what they tell me about their levels of engagement, that and, of course, what I hear from other sources.  I’m confident, however, that engagement is a component either consciously or unconsciously considered when individuals consider a new employment destination.    You may be able to relate, but I tend to find an almost palpable difference between engaged and unengaged workforces just by “walking the floor”.  The middle ground is certainly harder to ascertain, but the extremes are obvious.  Here are some thoughts (happy for debate) regarding engagement and the attraction of talent:

  • Engaged organisations have better employment brands.  As such, there will be greater levels of demand / interest from potential hires.
  • An increase in candidate supply should provide greater choice; you would think improve the ultimate outcome.
  • Engagement and the perception of the employment brand will determine the sourcing strategies; contribute to the shape of the recruitment infrastructure; and, determine the reliance on external providers.
  • Trade-offs may be required when recruiting for unengaged (unattractive) organisations, i.e. compensating through higher remuneration.
  • The candidate experience is typically more enjoyable (authentically so) when interviewing with a highly engaged organisation.
  • Ultimately all these will have impacts on cost and quality of hire.

Scott Duncan 

The Internal Perspective

I am sure you’ll agree that employee engagement is key to attracting and retaining the best talent. At Chorus we are firmly committed to making the employment experience sticky so we can retain our best people. Our overall HR plan is to ensure our people’s experience of Chorus is exceptional; a fundamental part of this plan is to focus on employee engagement. Having a highly engaged workplace makes it easy to attract and retain the right people and makes it a difficult choice for our people to leave.

Aside from (selfishly!) wanting to work in a great environment ourselves, the HR team are focused on this goal because we know that people don’t just tend to stick to great workplaces, they tell others about it which enhances our reputation even further. Our ultimate aim is to have all out people say: “Chorus is the best place I have ever worked”.

I am confident this strategy is working because over the past two years I have lost count of how many times I’ve been told that one of the main reasons people want to work at Chorus is because they’ve heard about out workplace reputation. When I say I have lost count, I don’t exaggerate – we have doubled our workforce in this time!   We have made significant numbers of these hires by referral as we have found that engaged employees take greater accountability for the organisational success.

Another key part of our strategy is to ensure our people know that engagement is not just something HR does, but something every employee owns. HR plays a critical part in coaching leaders on how to grow and sustain engagement in their teams, and I have noticed that people soon become advocates of the great environment in which we work.

Having ‘Aon Hewitt Best Employer’ status certainly supports our employment branding. And although it is a great achievement, we believe the real test is it what people hear and experience when they talk to our employees, ex-employees, customers and suppliers.  I love it when people say they’ve heard that Chorus is a great place to work – I feel very proud of this because I know it is rare to truly love being at work, supporting our goal of making Chorus a hard place to leave.

Andrew Burner

This week’s questions:

Q1)      Accepting that not all organisations are highly engaged, how have you mitigated candidate perceptions of low levels of engagement through the recruitment and on-boarding process?

Q2)      Why do organisations enter “Best Employer” surveys / competitions?

Q3)      How do you use engagement as an employment branding tool?

Q4)      How do you get every employee to own engagement, take responsibility for sustaining it?

Q5)      What are the levers /tools that you have used to boost engagement in your workplace?

#NZLEAD RECAP: Recruitment Processes – Are they still working?

So this week was about recruitment processes and if it really is necessary that a recruitment round takes so long. Recently I was interviewed and formally offered a position within 7 days (incl the weekend). It was painless, easy and quick. So my question out to the #NZLEAD community was if all the time usually spent is actually necessary?

Thursday’s chat was very intense. There was a lot of feeling expressed, especially from those who are recruiters, but then some controversial ideas thrown in the mix about how recruitment is different for different organisations and teams. To get the chat started I asked whether recruitment processes still work, the responses were varied:

I think the crux of the conversation came back to the quality of your recruitment processes. If you are open, honest and transparent with your recruitment process and especially timeframes, candidates are more willing to be patient. I applied for a role in March, received notification it was delayed for 2 MONTHS after I applied, another notification of delay 1 MONTH later and since then, nothing. I constantly followed up because I was keen to work for this company. In the end I just gave up. I didn’t want to work with a company who cared that little about the experience I was having as a candidate.

For most in the #NZLEAD conversation, it came down to the quality and agility of the process and how it is managed. Shona makes a good point:

It’s not just about the speed of recruiting someone, but the quality. Fiona Harland – Recruitment Consultant made a good point when speed comes at the expense of a good quality and timely hire:

At the end of the day, the processes are there for a reason but organisations have to work harder at being more agile and efficient. I believe that working in a speedy manner, while following all the steps of your processes can still enable you to make a good hire. I think it also comes down to the experience of the recruiting manager as well. If they know exactly what they are looking for and they express this to the market, they will get the right people – in this case, it won’t hurt to work quickly but effectively.

Organisations need to plan their recruitment, they need to be clear about what they want and put that out to the market.

RakshaHR makes the perfect statement about this.

This balance is the aim for all organisations, but work needs to be done to ensure you have the right balance that works for your organisation and your candidate pool. Recruitment will be around forever, but the way we manage and run recruitment will need to improve and adapt with the changing world of work!